Posts tagged Orange Ink
Experiment 11: "Orange" Ink Tests Part III

Up to this point, these orange ink tests have largely focused on orange/ yellow tones. Today, we move towards the red end of the spectrum with not two, but three more "orange" inks. I knew that the Franklin Christoph Philly Ink was somewhere in the red/ orange range, so I thought it would be perfect to pair against two "fall-colored" inks from Diamine. 

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 Experimental Test Subjects

Ink 1: Diamine Autumn Oak

Ink 2: Diamine Ancient Copper

Ink 3: Franklin-Christoph Philly Limited Edition '17

Experimental Variables

Pen 1: TWSBI Diamond 580 (1.1 Stub)

Pen 2: Ryan Krusac Legend (MCI)

Pen 3: Sailor Pro Gear (MF Nib)

Experimental Conditions

Paper 1: Tomoe River

Paper 2: Rhodia

Paper 3: Watercolor

Results in Pictures:

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Another shot of Franklin Christoph Philly Ink in Action

Another shot of Franklin Christoph Philly Ink in Action

Results in Words:

Orange Vs. Red:  Of all the inks I have scanned in for review so far, these were by far the most difficult to capture in terms of accurate color representation. The autumn oak is slightly more red-toned than the scans show. And for the Franklin Christoph- the scans just don't do the ink justice. It is definitely a red-based orange, but the scans bring out the red more heavily than it actually appears on the paper. I added an extra photo of the ink in action that is more true to the actual hue.

Is it more red or more orange? I still can't decide! Either way, it's basically an autumn sunset on paper. Can't go wrong with that. 

Compare/ Contrast: First of all, all three of these inks are an excellent value when you compare the price and performance to other inks I have tested. Unless the ink is pooled heavily on the paper, there is not much sheen to be found, but all three inks have some pretty stellar other qualities in my opinion. The light-to-dark shading of Autumn Oak is particularly striking especially in broader nibs. The shading of the Ancient Copper is less dramatic, but I really enjoyed the rich dark wine color of the ink overall. After testing it for several days, I would absolutely consider loading it into my work pen as a variation on my typical blue-black. 

Winning Combination: The Philly Pen Show is still traveling in my Ryan Krusac Legend. It's not the typical standard orange I would use as a go-to, but there is a depth to the unique orange-to-red shading in this ink, especially in the cursive italic nib, that really draws me to it. 

On deck: It's time to sing the blues. 

A look back at the 7 orange shades featured in ink tests so far. 

A look back at the 7 orange shades featured in ink tests so far. 

Experiment 7: Orange Series Ink Tests Part II

Time for Part II of the Orange Ink Tests. We've got two Sailors up to bat...

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Experimental Test Subjects

Ink 1: Sailor Kin-Mokusei

Ink 2: Sailor Bungubox Fresh Oranges of Lake Hamana

Experimental Variables 

Pen 1: Vintage Montblac (Flex Nib)

Pen 2: Vintage Parker 51 (Factory Stub Nib)

Pen 3: TWSBI Vac Mini (F Nib)

 Experimental Conditions

Paper 1: Tomoe River

Paper 2: Rhodia

Paper 3: Watercolor

Results in Pictures: 

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Sheen: Top is Kin-Mokusei/ Bottom is Fresh Oranges

Sheen: Top is Kin-Mokusei/ Bottom is Fresh Oranges

Results in Words: 

The Nib Matters: I'm not sure even the scans show how drastically different these inks appear across these three different nib types. The flex nib shows off the dark red/orange tones, while the vintage stub shows off more of the yellow undertones. Meanwhile, the fine nib looks most...well...orange.

Sheen: Both of these inks also have some amount of sheen. The sheen is mostly only on the Tomoe River Paper, but there is a little to be found on both the Rhodia and the Watercolor ink swabs. Even though you can't tell the difference in the photos/ scans, the sheen for the Kin-Mokusei is almost pink, while the Fresh Oranges sheen is more of a dark red. 

Compare/ Contrast: The Kin-Mokusei is significantly brighter orange especially in the side-by-side swabs. When you get down to the fine nibs, however, it is hard to tell the difference. 

Winning Combination: I could write with either one of these inks in that vintage stub nib every single day. For me, it is here where the shading and readability hit the perfect balance, and I think the effect in a fine or medium cursive italic would likely be similar. 

On deck: A Tribe of Diamine Oranges

Experiment 5: Introducing Ink Tests (The Orange Series Part I)

At a certain point in gathering/collecting/hoarding inks, you reach a threshold where an organized cataloging and testing system becomes beneficial. When I outgrew my first "ink box," I knew I had reached that point. When I divided my collection into three color coordinated storage containers, I knew I was way passed it.

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I began testing different ink swab cards and ink testing techniques. I studied different formats of ink reviews online. There are plenty of amazing ones out there- some beautiful and artistic, and some detailed and technical.

If there was something that I want to see more of in terms of ink reviews it is comparison. Maybe it's just the scientist in me, but I want to know how an ink fares across different paper types. How does nib selection change the appearance of an ink? And how do writing samples of inks in the same color grouping look side-by-side? 

Sounds like a pretty good experiment to me. 

Introducing: Ink Tests

I'll load up one ink into three pens with varying nib types and sizes. I'll test the ink utilizing those three pens across at least three types of paper. Then, I'll clean that ink out and load up a comparator ink into those same three pens- and repeat the process all over again. Bonus points: the review format will require me to practice both my handwriting and my drawing skills. 

I'll store scans of each of these ink tests under the Ink Test Link on this site- grouped by color.  

Speaking of color, the first one up is (of course) orange. 

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Specifically my first two orange inks come from two up and coming ink brands- Robert Oster and Papier Plume.  

Experimental Test Subjects

Ink 1: Robert Oster NG Special '16  

Ink 2: Papier Plume Sazerac

Experimental Variables 

Pen 1: Sheaffer Legacy(Factory Stub Nib)

Pen 2: Pilot Vanishing Point(M Nib)

Pen 3: Sailor Pro Gear(H-MF Nib)

 Experimental Conditions

Paper 1: Tomoe River

Paper 2: Rhodia

Paper 3: Watercolor

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Results in Pictures:  

Results in Words: 

Interestingly, even though these inks look very similar on the watercolor paper swabs, their differences become more apparent on Tomoe River paper. NG Special has a more dramatic yellow undertone than the Sazerac. Both have great shading, especially in the wider nibs.

One point that really interested me was how differently the samples reacted to the Rhodia paper, especially in the ink swabs. With the Sazerac, it was almost as if the coating on the paper was visibly rejecting the ink. However, it looked completely normal once it dried, and I didn't even notice this property when using it in the M or the F nib. Sazerac really shines on Tomoe River. 

If I had to keep the NG Special in only one of these pens, it would be the Sheaffer Stub Nib no doubt, that shading is off the hook. For the Sazerac, I think I would keep it in the Vanishing point. The medium nib lays down enough ink to be an easily readable orange ink and even show some shading. And seriously, how can you beat that wax-sealed bottle?

Next up in The Orange Series Ink Tests? Two Sailor Oranges. Stay tuned.